Geothermal Heat Pumps Waukesha WI

Local resource for geothermal heat pumps in Waukesha, WI. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to ground source heat pump, central heating system, heat source, and heat sinks as well as advice and content on ground heat pump and solar heating.

Foresight Home Performance Inc
(414) 443-1859
607 N 116th St
Milwaukee, WI
 
Energy Building Tech
(414) 778-1133
11233 W Greenfield Ave
Milwaukee, WI
 
Energy Strategies Corp
(414) 354-9902
4324 W Bradley Rd
Milwaukee, WI
 
Reggie'S Fuel Oil Service
(414) 374-1422
102 W North Ave
Milwaukee, WI
 
Midwest Renewable Energy Association
(715) 592-6595
7558 Deer Road
Custer, WI
 
Wholesale Insulation Distributors
(414) 257-1200
8112 W National Ave
Milwaukee, WI
 
R C Electrical Sales
(414) 444-5789
3233 N 92nd St
Milwaukee, WI
 
Pieper Electric
(414) 831-1260
5070 N.35th st.
Milwaukee, WI
Services
Solar Electric and Wind Installation, Design, and Servicing

Murphy Energy Systems
(414) 810-0301
1027 E Hampton Rd
Milwaukee, WI
 
R C Electrical Sales
(414) 444-5789
3233 N 92nd St
Milwaukee, WI
 

Geothermal Ground Source Heat Pumps

Geothermal ground source heat pumps draw energy from the earth's crust. About 10 to 15 feet below the earth's surface there is a constant temperature (somewhere between 45 and 58 degrees Fahrenheit, depending on where you are). This constant temperature is used to heat homes during winter and cool them during summer.

Solar purists will note that geothermal energy is actually solar energy stored in the earth.

The principle is really very simple

When the air is colder than the ground ten or fifteen feet below the surface, the difference in temperature (heat) is transferred to the inside of the house through a system of piping. Geothermal heat transferred to your house makes it easier for your furnace to heat the air. The opposite principle works during summer: cooler temperatures underground cool your house.

How Geothermal works

The transfer of temperature from outside the house to inside is done a number of ways.

  • It can be transferred to a heating or cooling ventilation system.
    Since the ground is at a consistent temperature (between 45 and 60 degrees Fahrenheit, depending on the particular ground conditions where you live), it provides a more easily modifiable basic air temperature for your furnace or cooling system. For example, if you want to heat air to 70 degrees Fahrenheit, your furnace will have to do far less work than it normally would.
  • It can also be transferred in through a system of pipes in the floor.
    The air is already being heated in part by a system of piping running through the flooring of the house. Your gas or electric bill will be far lower (as much as 70% lower) than it would be otherwise. And it provides moderating cooling in summer, too.

This may sound a bit familiar to some people

Closed loop geothermal heat pumps are similar to solar thermal systems : water or anti-freeze circulates through a system of piping. (The pipes can also circulate air, though this is used less often). The temperature (...

Click here to read more from The Solar Guide

Geothermal Heat Pump System Types

The following is a brief overview of geothermal heat pump systems. If you are building a home, any of these systems can be a relatively low addition to construction costs that will save you lots of money down the road.

  1. Open Water or Open Well
    These systems circulate fresh water from a nearby well through the ground source heat pump, where heat is extracted in winter (and coolness in summer). These can be cheaper than other systems, because there is no need to dig a trench. However, these can affect the groundwater temperature, so there may be government regulations concerning this.
  2. Closed Loop Pond Systems
    A system of piping circulates water or anti-freeze through a pond bottom, where water temperature remains higher than air temperature. These systems can be susceptible to ice damage, but in some areas, these are especially effective at "air conditioning."
  3. Horizontal Closed Loops
    These are buried below the frost line (the deeper the better), circulating water or (usually) anti-freeze. Piping runs parallel to the surface, so it is relatively easy to install. Horizontal systems may be the best compromise between feasibility and cost.
  4. Vertical Closed Loop Systems
    These are the highest efficiency geothermal system. A loop of piping circulates water or anti-freeze deep into the ground, where the ground is even warmer due to its proximity to the earth's core. These also have the highest initial cost, but can be well worth it, if the sit...

Click here to read more from The Solar Guide

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