Cathodic Protection Systems Olathe KS

Local resource for Cathodic protection systems in Olathe, KS. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to electrochemical cells, metallic structures, steel water fuel pipelines as well as advice and content on storage tanks.

Professional Engineers, Inc.
(913) 390-6002
14955 W. 117th St., Ste. B
Kansas City, MO
 
Facility Engineering Associates, PC
(913) 486-8847
14341 Norwood
Leawood, KS
 
Affinis Corp.
(913) 239-1100
7401 W. 129th St., Ste
Overland Park,, KS
 
Terracon
(913) 492-7777
13910 W. 96th Terr
Lenexa, KS
 
Aquaterra Environmental Solutions, Inc.
(913) 681-0030
7311 W. 130th St., Ste. 100
Kansas City, MO
 
DLR Group
(913) 897-7811
7290 W. 133rd St.
Overland Park, KS
 
ARCADIS
(913) 492-0900
8725 Rosehill, Ste. 350
Lenexa, KS
 
Kaw Valley Engineering, Inc.
(913) 894-5150
14700 W. 114th Terr.
Lenexa, KS
 
Olsson Associates
(913) 381-1170
7301 W. 133rd St., Ste. 200
Overland Park, KS
 
Haley & Aldrich, Inc.
(913) 217-6900
8735 Rosehill Rd., Ste. 340
Kansas City, MO
 

Cathodic Protection

Solar energy is ideally used in situations where a remote source of power is needed and connection to the grid is too expensive. Some applications of solar energy in remote locations are as follows:

Cathodic protection is a process to protect vulnerable metals against corrosion. This is done using a small negative voltage applied to the metal. Bridges, wells and railway lines (to name a few examples) can be protected against corrosion when a positive terminal is attached to the metal and a sacrificial anode is attached to a piece of scrap metal.

Small solar energy and wind energy systems are used to power many cathodic protection systems. Solar PV panels and even small wind turbine systems along with batteries and other system components will work independently of source energy (wind or sun) for up to a week.

This reliability and economics (much cheaper than running hydro lines to any remote area) make these renewable energy sources a big player in the cathodic protection industry (a $2 billion a year industry in the US).

Trestles, pipelines, steel tanks and marine locations are some other structures protected against corrosion, using cathodic protection....

Click here to read more from The Solar Guide

Wind Energy for Cathodic Protection (Case Study #2)

All around the world, corrodible metals are exposed to air and rain. Replacing these structures would be a terrible expense for government and industry. Cathodic protection is needed to prevent corrosion of these vulnerable metals. This is done using a small negative voltage applied to metal. Bridges, wells and railway lines (to name just a few examples) can be protected against corrosion when a positive terminal is attached to the metal and a sacrificial anode is attached to a piece of scrap metal buried in the ground.

Small wind energy systems are used to power many cathodic protection systems. Wind turbine systems along with battery backup and other components work independently of the grid and are designed to go without source energy (wind) for up to a week.

This reliability and economics (much cheaper than running hydro lines to a remote area) make these renewable energy sources a big player in the cathodic protection industry (a $2 billion a year industry in the US).

Trestles, pipelines, steel tanks and marine locations are some other structures that benefit from cathodic protection provided by wind energy systems....

Click here to read more from The Solar Guide

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